6 Lessons On Work Ethic I Learned In One Year Of Professional Career

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Time flies. Recently I had completed one year as a full-time employee at my current employer Squad. A year has passed, and I decided it was time to revisit instances, memories, and experiences and to recollect what I had learned as a professional in this past year.

It was also a wake-up call to reassess and redirect the ship named professional career to make sure it doesn’t get stuck in a whirlpool.

After all, our career is our responsibility and we all should make efforts to “Own our story!”.

This is going to be a list of 6 important lessons in professionalism and work ethic that I learned working as a Product Engineer at one of the most innovative startups in India.

1. Know your field

Do you know what a facade pattern is? Do you know what sprint and story points are? Do you know how to work your way with the debugger your IDE provides?

A wealth of ideas, disciplines, techniques, tools, and terminologies have decorated the last fifty years of our field. And if we want to be a professional we want to know a sizeable chunk of it.

The motto that I believe in is, “If you want to see far, stand on the shoulder of the giants”.

 

2. Continuous Learning

The frenetic range with which the industry is changing, it means that we as engineers also need to learn colossal amount just to keep up.

Read books, read articles, watch talks. Keep adding deltas to your learning daily.

 

3. Practice

This stuck me around 2 months back. Tennis is my favorite sport, and players believe that playing in the tournaments continuously actually makes their game less polished.

It’s the deliberate practice of doing things right, which makes it gleamy again.

Is it true about our jobs also? Cutting corners to meet deadlines, working on the outdated stack at the company, working with legacy code, can all this make us less sharp.

At least I find it to be true, and practice to deliberately improve your craft is a vital component of one’s work ethic.

 

4. Know your domain

It is the duty of every software developer to understand the domain of the solutions that they are programming. If you are writing software for healthcare, get at least a basic understanding of healthcare, if you are writing for sales, know about sales.

Read a book or two on the domain, ask the domain experts.

We should be able to know enough about the domain to question the product direction and feature requests that we get.

 

5. Collaboration and mentoring

We all must make special efforts to collaborate, mentor and get mentored by other developers.

Whatever I have learned in this course of one year, a major portion of it due to learning from others.

 

6. Humility

Programming is an act of creation. It feels like magic when we can write code that can do things that can produce tremendous value.

We all should take pride in our work, but never be arrogant about it. We should be confident in our abilities and take risks.

But we must know that we will fail. Things that we create will break, risks will be proven wrong and we will be called upon for these mistakes.

And when all this will happen, all we can do is be humble and take Howard’s advice, laugh and move on.

 

That’s all, folks!

 

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7 Tips On Making Your Engineering Workflow Faster

One of the most important thing that I like about pair programming with other awesome engineers is you get to see their workflows. How they get things done? How they get find and make their way around tools, terminal, and editors?

After witnessing and getting awestruck by many such experiences I realized that having an effective workflow can increase your day to productivity many folds.

The next step was to take action, and while doing so, I have compiled few tips to make your engineering flow faster too.

1. Identify waste:

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According to the Toyota Principles:

A waste is any hardship and drudgery that doesn’t align itself with what customer requires and is willing to pay for.

The First step towards developing a ninja workflow is to do an audit and identify waste.

Identifying waste is the first step towards eliminating it.

Ex. My workflow had many wastes like not automating enough, not harnessing the power of IDEs, waiting for the large codebase to reload etc.

2. Get proficient with your IDE:

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Today, IDEs are super power packed. To develop an awesome workflow, we must learn how to harness the power of our IDEs.

I use PyCharm for my day to day work and have witnessed very considerable efficiency increase once I took steps to become proficient with it.

Features like:

  • Custom live templates
  • Smarter code navigation
  • Custom keyboard shortcuts
  • Debugger
  • Distraction free mode
  • Plugins

All make you a power user. It’s worth investing time given the return on investment.

3. Get familiar with Unix shell commands:

Getting familiar with Unix shell commands is a game changer. First, it makes you look smart and second it helps you automate stuff.

I noticed that I used to do a set of repeated tasks every day when I started working.

  1. Login to office WiFi network
  2. Open browser
  3. Open Slack in tab
  4. Open mail in a tab
  5. Start the IDE
  6. Activate virtual environment
  7. Checkout VCS repository etc.

And now all it looks like is:

~$ startwork

You get the idea. Invest some time and become a Unix power user.

4. Automate your manual workflows:

Developing skills to automate takes time. Whether they are using shell scripts, browser extensions or little code snippets.

Investing time in automating workflows is a high leverage activity.

Ex. You don’t need to manually follow a certain flow of the app to test out something every time, which takes 2-3 mins.

Can we automate this and do this in 2-3 seconds.

How much time will it save if suppose we do this 25-30 times on average?

Ex. Or automating generating search tags for blog posts 😛

5. Prefer keyboard over mouse:

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We all will agree. Using mouse is slow. Using keyboard over mouse helps decrease the time it takes to perform actions by many folds.

The action that was buried under 3 sub-menus can now be performed just by pressing a key combination.

Personally, for this, I would highly recommend a plugin for JetBrains IDEs called key promoter. It’ll help big time in getting over our mouse addiction.

6. Learn at least one productive high-level language:

Getting things done in a language like Python is way faster than something like say,  Scala.

Learning at least one high-level language allows us to quickly test out ideas and implement them.

No more resistance of writing a 20 line class just to test out an API call to a service.

Move fast and test out ideas on an interactive interpreter instead of compiling code files.

7. Make it easy and fast to run the unit tests associated with just your current changes:

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Running the entire test suite or even the test suite of the module you touched can be time-consuming. Life is too short for that.

To quickly validate things, make it super easy and fast to run the unit tests of just your current changes.

Personally for this, I use the copy reference feature of PyCharm a lot, and obviously, I use the keyboard shortcuts to do so.

Conclusion

With this post, I wanted to share some ways that I’ve been consciously working on to making my engineering workflow as efficient as possible. Still, there is a big room for improvement, but hopefully, this article would’ve been of a little help at least.

That’s all, folks!

 

5 Coolest features of Android Studio

Android Studio is out and stable now. It is always fun to try new tools. Right?

So far it has been around 2 months since I have been using Android Studio. And I guess it is the best time to select my personal choice of 5 coolest features of it.

If you want some technical or geeky feature list RTFM! This post is not meant for that.

1. Code preview scrolling

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This is one of my favorite feature. In fact I loved this feature in intelliJ also. Scrolling through endless page of code becomes so easy and fluid with this feature. Claps! for the makers.

2. Inbuilt terminal

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This just increases the comfort of accessing the terminal. Whether it is for adb commands or something else, an easy to access inbuilt terminal always helps.

3. Tab switcher

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Working on Android projects includes working with many files including classes, layouts, values, styles etc.

What else can be useful more then a rocking tab switcher made for this purpose only.

4. Color and Image preview

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As a developer one works with hex codes and ids of images. And then there are color and image previews just to make feel comfortable.

5. Smart code recognitioncode_inspection

Code inspection in Android Studio is pretty impressive. It guides you to maintain good quality code and instructs you like coding teacher.

That’s all folks! These were my favorite features of Android Studio. Of course these were not technical like better build system or performance stats, but at least these are more attractive to someone looking forward to use this amazing IDE.

Comment your favorite feature. I am excited to hear from you guys!